Trust Jack Foundation

                                            putting mental heath first


Email: contact@trustjackfoundation.co.uk

We aim to raise awareness of mental health issues to young people and parents and to raise funds to support young people in their recovery

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© 2016 Trust Jack Foundation - Registered Charity Number SC046334 (Scotland)  |  Site Design: LJKuk

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Trust Jack Foundation

PO Box 19151

Larkhall, ML9 9AG


Phone: 07981 953794


contact@trustjackfoundation.co.uk


Contact Details

Mind

YoungMinds

SAMH

Mental Health Foundation

SANE

NHS Choices


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Trust Jack Foundation


Information Pages for Parents

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CAMHS

CAMHS is used as a term for all services that work with children and young people who have difficulties with their emotional or behavioural wellbeing.

Children and young people may need help with a wide range of issues at different points in their lives. Parents and carers may also need help and advice to deal with behavioural or other problems their child is experiencing. Parents, carers and young people can receive direct support through CAMHS.

To access CAMHS you should contact your GP or search online for CAMHS services in your local area.

Mental Health in Children and Young People

Mental health problems affect about 1 in 10 children and young people. They include depression, anxiety and conduct disorder, and are often a direct response to what is happening in their lives.

Alarmingly, however, 70% of children and young people who experience a mental health problem have not had appropriate interventions at a sufficiently early age.The emotional wellbeing of children is just as important as their physical health.

Good mental health allows children and young people to develop the resilience to cope with whatever life throws at them and grow into well-rounded, healthy adults

© Mental Health Foundation. This article is published in full at mentalhealth.org.uk

Talking to Children About Feelings

If you’re worried about a child, encouraging them to talk can be very helpful, whether you're a parent, grandparent, friend or teacher.

If you think a child you know has a problem, it can be hard to know how to start talking to them about it. When there are problems at home, such as parents fighting or divorcing or a death in the family, children can become withdrawn and upset.

Being able to talk to someone other than a parent is sometimes very helpful for children. Grandparents, uncles, aunts, teachers or even a counsellor can all offer support.

This information is published in full at nhs.uk

Is Your Child Depressed?

Lots of people think depression only affects adults. But children and teenagers can become depressed as well.

According to figures from the Office of National Statistics, 10% of children in Great Britain aged between 5 and 16 have a mental health problem, with 4% of children suffering from an emotional disorder such as anxiety or depression.

The problem for parents is that depression in children can be difficult to spot.

This information is published in full at nhs.uk

Anxiety Disorders in Children

It’s normal for children to feel worried or anxious from time to time, such as when they’re starting school or nursery, or moving to a new area.

Anxiety is a feeling of unease, such as worry or fear – it's an understandable reaction in children to change or a stressful event.

But for some children, anxiety affects their behaviour and thoughts on a daily basis, interfering with their school, home and social life. This is when you may need professional help to tackle it before it becomes a more serious issue.

This information is published in full at nhs.uk

ADHD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - or ADHD - is thought to be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain that affects attention, concentration and impulsivity.

Someone with ADHD might have significant attention problems, appear restless, fidgety, overactive and impulsive. They can act before thinking and often speak before thinking by blurting out and interrupting others.


© Mental Health Foundation. This article is published in full at mentalhealth.org.uk